<div dir="ltr">Hi,<div><br></div><div>I will try to dispel your misunderstanding:</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Mar 5, 2014 at 7:31 PM, Michel Gauthier <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:mg@telepresse.com" target="_blank">mg@telepresse.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">Dear Seth,<br>
<br>
My question may look silly, but I try to find where lies the real political problem.<br>
as far I understand:<br>
1. if one country decides to use a chunk of IP addresses for its citizens nobody will deny them</blockquote><div><br></div><div>First, countries aren&#39;t the unit of IP address allocation.  In some cases, nation states do have a block or blocks of IPs for their own use, but it is service providers who normally get allocations (blocks of addresses or ranges of addresses).</div>

<div><br></div><div>If France for example decided to use 10/8 for all of it&#39;s citizens, then ALL ISPs would block that range (as it is reserved for private addressing in RFC1918).  If France decided to use 3/8 (3.0.0.0 -3.255.255.255) for its citizens then ISPs (besides those in France who were presumably mandated to route those blocks) would filter out these route announcements as that block is listed as registered to<span style="color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:sans-serif;font-size:13.63636302947998px"> </span><font color="#000000" face="sans-serif">General Electric Company in the IANA registry.</font></div>

<div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">
 and the calls will be routed.<br>
</blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>If they were IP based calls, no.  If they were POTS calls, they wouldn&#39;t use IP addresses.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">


2. if a relational space or a country and a language (not to speak of a VN) decides to use another naming system than the DNS or another class than class IN nothing will prevent it from doing so.<br></blockquote><div><br>

</div><div>Correct, besides the lack of interoperability with the rest of the Internet.</div><div><br></div><div> rgds,<br></div><div><br></div><div>McTim</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div class=""></div></blockquote></div></div></div>